Friday, September 10, 2010

SENDING A SOUVENIR OF LOVE INTO THE WILD BLUE YONDER...

As we promised you, we hereby share our photographs of the mylar balloon-launching from the site of our 1960 wedding. Instead of just one photo, we have a series (and then some! tucked away as souvenirs), thanks to our dear friend and neighbor Connie Luhta.

We attached our note as firmly as we could, and the balloon took off in winds that might have defeated a real hot-air balloon. But it soon achieved its altitude and took off for the southwest. How far? Wouldn't it be nice if we had a miniature chip in the balloon that could track it's entire course?

But like life itself, and marriage, the future holds some mysteries we cannot know ahead of time.

Thank you for celebrating our Golden Anniversary week with us.

With love,
Bob and Rose Moore


AND NOW VIEW THE SERIES OF PHOTOS BELOW!

CHOOSING THE ANNIVERSARY BALLOON...

Our good friend Connie accompanied us on our Golden Anniversary Balloon Launch at the church in my hometown where Bob and I were married 50 years ago today. She filmed an entire series, start to finish, starting with us at a party store where we chose our balloon for send-off...

SECURING OUR NOTE FOR THE LAUNCH...

 

HOLDING TIGHT TO THE BALLOON IN PRE-LAUNCH WINDS...

 

WITH HELP FROM THE WINDS, A PERFECT SEND-OFF...

 

UP, UP AND AWAY!!!

 

TOASTING A SUCCESSFUL LAUNCH...

From out of the wild winds, we stopped at a sunny cafe in our neighborhood, for a post-launch lunch.


NOTE; CLICK ON 'OLDER POSTS' (BOTTOM RIGHT) to go back through postings of the past five days, our Golden Anniversary Week.

Thursday, September 9, 2010

DAY FOUR--PART III---GOLDEN ANNIVERSARY SERIES: "WHAT MARRIAGE IS FOR"...

Bob and I agreed it was an irony, on this eve of our 50th wedding anniversary, to pull the special-edition news magazine from our mailbox and see the large, bold letters of the cover story: WHAT MARRIAGE IS FOR.

We quickly scanned the associated stories and discovered that they covered the government's role, the political questions, the gay versus straight, the religious side, the history and a whole lot more.

We chose not to dive into the articles. At our age, we decided it's enough to know what marriage has been for us during these years that have flown by so fast that we can hardly believe our married years have added up to 50.

For us, marriage has been a strong and loving partnership. We have worked together and played together; raised children together and married those children off; lost loved ones and gained loved ones...

We have learned things and forgotten things; made money and lost money; gloried over triumphs and together handled disappointments; lived with health and lived with illness...

We have laughed and we have cried. Our years have been filled with joys as well as sorrows, but they have never NOT been filled with love.

We have lived a great many more years as a married couple than we lived as single people.

We have never NOT wanted to be with each other, and as tomorrow's Golden Anniversary arrives, we pray for as many more good years together as providence can send us.

So, what is marriage for? For us it's been the way to live.

We are blessed.

DAY FOUR--PART II OF GOLDEN WEDDING WEEK MEMORIES; "LOOK WHAT WE STARTED!"...

These--the human beings in the four photos below--are our joys.

Our sons are: Mark, born Nov. 1961, married to Christine; Bryan, born Nov. 1967, married to Karla; Kevin, bn. Dec. 1969, married to Kimberly.

Mark and Kevin live in nearby Geauga County; Bryan lives in Bremerton, WA near Seattle.

GRANDKIDS!!!

Grandchildren, from left: Jenna (Kevin & Kim); little Bob (Bryan & Karla); Maddie and Katie (Mark & Chris) at our house for Christmas circa 2003
 
 

Mark & Chris wedding

 

Bryan & Karla wedding

 

Kevin & Kim wedding

 

 

Bob & Rose at their honeymoon home, a farm, in 1960.

(NOTE FROM ROSE: If this is the bottom of a page, click on "OLD POSTS" in bottom right corner to continue).

DAY FOUR--PART I---MEMORIES IN OUR GOLDEN WEDDING WEEK: "A HABIT FORMED BY A HONEYMOONER ON THE FARM"...

>   For our honeymoon house, we rented (quite reasonably) a very old but very cozy farmhouse, on acreage with a small but pretty lake. The owner had moved to another state and didn't want the farmhouse standing empty. (That farmhouse still stands, beautifully restored and much enlarged---but the 30 acres have been split and the small lake has not existed for many years).
    We didn't live in that place for long, as much as we liked it. In winter, the old cold furnace had a ferocious apetite we simply couldn't afford, and it was a chore just to keep the house bearably warm on the coldest winter days.
    In summer and fall, however, it was a wonderful place to be. The acreage was a fine place for honeymooners to roam together, particularly people who enjoyed the outdoors as Bob and I always have.
    There was a sturdy barn on site, and one day Bob decided to give me shooting lessons with a target he had attached to the barn. I was an absolute failure at that; I actually couldn't even hit the barn---and the only gun he owned had such a kick it knocked me over every time (thin as I was in those days). 
    The tractor, however, was another story. The landlord had left it with us for mowing purposes, and I easily and happily learned to run it. Early in our marriage, as a matter of fact, I became Bob Moore's "lawn boy. " In our second home, I mowed the lawn with a push-mower, but after awhile he bought me a tractor.
    I've always found it quite relaxing to sit on a tractor and mow, and I love the meditative qualities of that pursuit. To this day, if I'm trying to solve a mental block, I can get on the tractor and mow... and any clouds inside my mind will clear miraculously.
    I do remember, though, that in a certain period in Concord, I was one of the few women who boldly mowed by tractor. Once, in fact, I was stopped in that work and chastised by a well-dressed woman in an expensive car, who said to me, "Don't you know that women of your character don't do such things? Much less right out in the open where they can be seen by passers-by; mowing and tractors are men's work. Your husband should be ashamed."
    I jumped back on my tractor and ignored her, but I commenced to wonder what "women of my character" were, exactly. And I resented that something I enjoyed so much was to be relegated only to men. I knew my husband never seemed to be ashamed of his tractor-mowing wife; and if he had been, I would still have fought to be the one who drove the tractor. Of course I kept on with my mowing, and I still do mow.
   Over time, my tractors became newer... easier... more comfortable. My husband often joked, and still does, that it would have been cheaper to keep his wife in jewels than it has been to keep her in tractors.
   Even in this special week, you may have spotted me mowing our valley acreage. With a happy smile on my face!


NOTE FROM ROSE: If the page ends here, click on "NEW POSTS" at bottom right of page to contine with the GOLDEN ANNIVERSARY WEEK series.

Wednesday, September 8, 2010

DAY 3--PART II--"A HUSBAND, A FLOWER TREE AND MISCHIEF!"--DAY 3, PART II--MEMORIES IN OUR GOLDEN ANNIVERSARY WEEK

    I've written about this before, but it's a great memory for me.
    Last summer, as I sat one morning with my husband over early-morning coffee, Bob seemed to be watching me intently, and he was obviously holding back a smile. What was he up to?
    I glanced out the window and saw that my arborvita was blooming! Pink flowers all over it!
    Bob started laughing, and I realized what had happened. The afternoon before, I had cut back my petunias to encourage a fresh flush of growth---(That does work!)---and my husband had mischievously gathered the cast-off blooms. In the cool of the evening, when I wasn't watching, he had carefully arranged them on the arborvita, and they still looked fresh when I spotted them in the morning.
    Imagine! An arborvita in bloom for his wife! (The flowers lasted one full day).


NOTE FROM ROSE: If this is the end of the page, click onto "New Posts" at bottom right of the page to go back to the previous anniversary postings.

DAY 3--PART I--"FLOWERS ARE FOR LOVE"--A MEMORY FOR A GOLDEN ANNIVERSARY WEEK...

     Out of the countless memories of 50 years of marriage, a special kindness from my husband came to mind yesterday as we lunched on the porch near the front-yard flower gardens.
     Bob has always loved growing his vegetables; I grew the flowers. He would often tuck a vegetable in among my flowers. ("You can't eat flowers," he'd say).
    And I would just as often tuck flowers in among his vegetables. "It makes them look better," I'd tell him, "Some flowers even repel the critters." (I could see he never believed that).      

     In our younger years when times were tight financially, he might sometimes ask, "How much do we pay for all those flowers?" And when he did that, I would simply smile and tell him, "You don't want to know; just enjoy them."
     With his frequent teasing about my flower gardens, if I ever got the feeling he didn't enjoy them himself, that feeling was banished forever after I suffered a serious brain hemmorage in fall of 1995. I was still in recovery mode in the following springtime, and we both realized that I wouldn't be planting my gardens of flowers that year.
     One morning he went out with his truck, and when he returned, he brought a comfortable chair outside and set it within view of my garden space, in front of the porch; I could see that space had been carefully weeded and prepped.
    The chair was for me, he said as he brought me a cup of hot coffee and then backed his truck onto the lawn. He began unloading a great number of flower plants; and all were my favorites.
     "I'll keep positioning these plants in the garden, and you keep telling me where they look good, until I get it right," he instructed me, and the process began. When the positioning was right, he began the careful planting.
     It was the loveliest garden ever, planted and nurtured by a loving husband.
     It said a lot about what Bob and I have had together all these years.

Tuesday, September 7, 2010

DAY TWO--PART IV---A GOOD THOUGHT FOR OUR ANNIVERSARY...

My little sister Annie (Ruth Anne) sent us an anniversary card today.

I loved the simplicity and truth of the few words on the cover:

"Time doesn't fly. It dances."

ANNIVERSARY MEMORY: OUR 1960 WEDDING "ON THE CHEAP'!


 BY ROSE MOORE, GAZETTE NEWSPAPERS 2007


    Bob and I were married in 1960. Being a mother of sons, I haven't had to plan or stage a wedding since that wedding day. Therefore  I was startled when, in 2007, I was asked to prepare a special column for the annual Gazette Newspapers bridal supplement.
  "What would I have to offer to our modern brides except for my own sentimental memories of a wedding in another era?" I protested. In the editors' eyes, apparently, that was enough.
    When it comes to weddings, some things have changed since 1960, and some things have remained the same. Love is no doubt still the biggest reason for a marriage. But today the weddings, even among ordinary people, are far more lavish and expensive. They're big business and seem to need a wedding planner and at least a year of planning. And children, unless they're in the wedding party, are seldom guests at the reception.
    As for Bob and me and our own wedding, though we agree we wouldn't change a thing, I confess that it was put together "on the cheap." And I, with no experience at all in such a social matter, was the wedding planner.
    I had happily accepted Robert Moore's proposal five months before the wedding and would have married him immediately, had he wanted it that way. But to my relief, we both shared an old-fashioned sense of  tradition and wanted our families and friends to share our special day. I chose the church---St. Mary's in Painesville---where three generations of my family had worshipped. I also chose the date, Sept. 10, because September was the month in which my own parents had been married.
    I knew I'd need at least the five-month interval after Bob's proposal, because my mother was a widow still raising a family, and paying for the wedding would need to be my own responsibility. As it turned out, it was not as difficult as I had imagined it might be, thanks to loving teamwork rising up from many places. For instance:
     *Neal and Karl Katila of Neal Printing did the invitations and other printed matter at little cost. For the previous few years I had inhabited an office at their company, editing the Fairport Beacon for Rowley Publications, and the Katilas had become my friends.
     *A forever-friend, my bridesmaid Mary York (later Horrigan), suggested she design and make the attendants' dresses, with no charge for her expert work. For practicality, her silk creations of ice-aqua would be designs that could be worn again for other occasions.
     *My future mother-in-law, learning I was pricing caterers for a simple luncheon reception in the manner of a French cafe, convinced me that she, her sister and I could accomplish that together. It worked out beautifully.
    *Our "official photographers" were the many family members who volunteered to share the photos they would take that day. They turned out a charming variety, though most were in 35mm color slides, a favored photo method of that era.
    *A friend of my future husband asked if she could do our wedding cake. A hobbyist whose skill was known, her price was more than reasonable and she produced a spectacular multi-tiered cake that matched the florist's rose motif.
     *For an amazingly low price, our florist was a celebrated local gardener whose personal rose gardens would provide the raw materials for a veritable "festival of roses."
     *My friend "Yorkie," with my future sister-in-law Vivian Moore (later Montgomery), accompanied me on a hilarious afternoon in Cleveland, looking for a wedding dress. How could we have imagined the first shop we arrived at would be closing down and selling out the inventory?
    It was there I bought a dress of chantilly lace; a veil with seed-pearl tiara; shoes, white gloves (a social requisite in those days); hoop skirt and crinoline petticoats (also a style of the day)... Everything, in fact, except the nylon stockings. And all these things were mine for a miraculous total of $60!! A great bargain for sure, but in yesteryear's money it did represent almost two weeks of my salary, after taxes.
    What would be my "Something Old"? My mother gifted me with an intricate gold chain and heirloom gold medallion my father had won in a scholarship competition when he was but a schoolboy. That special talisman made me feel that my beloved father, who had died when I was just 14, was somehow with me on my wedding day.
    The "Something New" was from my bridegroom, a bracelet with a tiny engraved marriage license. (Later he would add three more charms---a birth certificate as each of our sons was born.)
    Early on my wedding morning, Mom produced the "Something Borrowed"---a vintage handkerchief which she assured me had never been allowed to wipe a nose! (I didn't use it for that purpose either).
    "Something Blue" was a blue silk garter I had impulsively purchased as a teenager at Painesville's old Gail G. Grant department store.
    THE WEDDING ITSELF... Well, it began with an incident; the groom was LATE! Noticeably so! As the minutes ticked away (and away and away) there were some very nervous people, but I wasn't one of them. From the very beginning I had learned that, for my prince, time and deadlines were foreign concepts. He was late for our first date and for every date thereafter.
    Already I had struck a bargain with him regarding that imperfection; it would be a trade-off for at least one imperfection of my own; I would NEVER sew for him! The women in his family had special talent for the sewing arts, but that talent would cease to be a universal trait among the family women the day I joined the clan. I hated sewing and just plain wasn't going to do it. (As it turned out, we meshed well anyway. I had a perfect sense of time and deadlines that would serve Bob well, and his mother readily provided any necessary seamstress services).
    In 1960, children were still plentiful among the guests at family weddings and receptions. How wonderful it was, therefore, for us to exit from the church into the warm Sepember sunshine and find ourselves immersed in a colorful shower of rose petals tossed exuberantly by the little children of our families.
    In some cultures, sunshine is a good omen on a wedding day; in others, rain denotes good luck. We had both! We left our afternoon reception in a torrential cloud-burst that seemingly arrived from nowhere.
    Job restrictions dictated that our honeymoon be little more than a weekend drive. There were not yet freeways, and Route 20 was our east-west "super highway" as we headed out toward the mellow countryside of upstate New York. The road was full of travellers, and we soon discovered a dearth of vacant rooms at the hotels. Finally, at 2 in the morning just out of Westfield, N.Y., we spotted a cluster of tiny buildings, and one vacancy. This little white cottage was primitive but clean. Its one small room had worn linoleum floors, no heat, and a tiny "water closet" (toilet-in-a-closet).
    We still take many day-trips to that region of wineries and pretty towns like Westfield and Mayville. A year or two ago we found those "little houses" still existed, somewhat changed for the worse. Now they were "hitched" together in slapdash manner with additions for itinerant housing, and big trees surrounded them in what had once been just a field. Even the trees couldn't camouflage another major change; the property now was littered with a wide variety of junk! We joked about installing a landmark plaque: "The Moore Honeymoon Site--Sept. 10 of 1960."
    What might we plan when Sept. 10, 2010---our Golden Anniversary---rolls around. On that occasion, would we plan a ceremony to renew our wedding vows? Probably not, we decided; our old vows have been holding up quite well, despite their age.
     But if we did, we know the "Something Old" this time around for both of us would be... EACH OTHER!!

Written in 2007 for Gazette Newspapers by Rose Moore, who is still happy with her tardy prince.

DAY TWO--PART II: GOLDEN ANNIVERSARY WEEK: "NOTES FROM AN OLD WIFE"...

(CLICK ON PHOTO OF PAGE TO ENLARGE)

A page from "Pieces of My Mind," a one volume limited edition of original Prose and Poetry written for my husband as a Christmas present in 1991.

SAMPLER "NOTES FROM AN OLD WIFE" (from Pieces of My Mind, 1991):

"BLIND-SIDED BY TIME"...
Our spirits walk as buoyant, but
it's harder to get started.
Our heart and soul are youngsters, but
our muscle tone's departed.
We still are not too old to dream, or
dance all night like Twinkle-toes,
But dreaming often leads to sleep,
and dancing's better when it's slow!
+++++++++++++++++

"GOING TO THE DOGS"...
We dreamed of days when kids were grown:
Our life would be a travelogue;
foot-loose, roaming, honeymooning,
with private time for dialogue...
A carefree time when you and I
could frolic free as pollywogs;
no kids to tend; loose schedules;
and romantic mid-life epilogue...

But when we looked around to find
the kids were gone... We'd bought a DOG!!
++++++++++++++

"BREAKING THE SPACE BARRIERS"...
We've spent the nights
of our long marriage
close together
in a nice old-style
double bed.

Never switched to Queen size;
never switched to King size;
cozy we slept
in our own double bed.

Over the years
our children have told us:
Try King size, try Queen size;
you'll never go back.

One night when we travelled,
we paid extra dollars
to get us a King size
in a first-class hotel.

All through the night
we kept losing each other.

So now we agree:
If offered a King size
for the same price as "our size,"
we'll always take "our size;"
it's the best way to go.

We might even pay EXTRA
for LESS space between us.
+++++++++

"FOREPLAY AFTER FIFTY"...
Foreplay is a knowing smile
between two people.
Foreplay is a friendly touch
of long-married hands.
Foreplay is a snooze on a
shoulder you know well.
Foreplay is a quiet talk,
an impulsive hug.
Foreplay is cozy and mellow;
an everyday grace.
Foreplay has changed,
and not for the worse.
+++++++++


DAY TWO--PART I: GOLDEN ANNIVERSARY WEEK: "LAUNCHING A BALLOON"

THis morning Bob and I decided we would launch a note on a mylar balloon. Launch date is Friday, date of our actual 50th wedding anniversary. We'll attach a note with our address, phone #, email address...
We'll have to come out of the valley, of course, or the note will end up tangled in our trees. Perhaps we'll go to Kevin's house because it's on a high knoll that seems to sit above everything.
Or perhaps we'll go to St. Mary's where our wedding took place, and launch it from there.
Or perhaps we'll hit the highway to Westfield, NY, and send it from there. That's where we stayed on our wedding night.
We haven't decided.
The launch of our anniversary balloon is a symbol to us, that even after 50 years, we still have a bit of our youth in our hearts.

Monday, September 6, 2010

DAY ONE--PART IV: "GOLDEN CELEBRATION" CONT'D: OUT INTO THE SUNSHINE STEP THE NEWLYWED BOB AND ROSE

A moment after this photo was shot, the exuberant little boys at the foot of the steps showered us with rosebuds, from which the thorns had been removed.

NOTES:
*The children that day were endlessly fascinated with my wedding dress. It was styled with a skirt of tiered lace. In the fashion of the day, it gained its voluminous shape from the large hoop and numerous crinoline petticoats beneath. For me, it took great care (and some pre-practice at home) not to move the skirt and expose my underwear as Bob and I knelt for prayer at the altar rail.
*Female attendants behind us at left of photo were: Mary York (now Horrigan), who had been my best friend since first grade. It was she who made the attendants' silk dresses. And my new sister-in-law Vivian Moore (later Montgomery).
*The officiating priest, St. Mary's pastor, Rt. Rev. Msgr. William J. Gallena, shocked some people by using the words "love, honor and cherish" for my portion of the vows, instead of the traditional "love, honor and obey." Later I asked him if he was aware he had done that. He smiled (rather slyly, I thought) at the question, and all he would say by way of explanation was, "It was not a mistake." My aunt Helen was much amused by that, telling me, "Father Gallena has known you since you were born. He probably realized you were much more apt to be a wife who would cherish than to be a wife who would obey."

NOTE FROM ROSE: The anniversary postings began on Monday, Sept. 6. Click on "Older Posts" (at lower right of page) to get to the beginning.

DAY ONE--PART III: "GOLDEN CELEBRATION" CONT'D: DOWN THE AISLE AFTER THE VOWS

"And that's how it all began, my dears.
      And that's how it all began."
                      ---      Rudyard Kipling
 
The old photo is faded, but the memory is strong.
The newlyweds leaving the church---
2:45 p.m., St. Mary Church, Painesville, Ohio--9-10-1960

DAY ONE--PART II: "GOLDEN CELEBRATION" CONT'D: A SHOWER OF GIFTS & GOOD WISHES...

Tables heaped high with gifts, and tables heaped high with food, were hallmarks of the first co-ed wedding shower I had ever seen; it was a Moore tradition. A few months before the wedding, the entire family and extended family gathered to shower us with gifts and good wishes. I knew I was marrying into a real family, committed to each other.

DAY ONE--PART I--"THE WEEK OF THE GOLDEN WEDDING ANNIVERSARY; A CELEBRATION FOR TWO"

My husband and I hereby proclaim this "The Week of the Golden Wedding Anniversary--a Celebration for Two."
 
Between now and Friday, Sept. 10, 2010, this space will share anniversary-oriented words and photos.
 
Fifty years is a long time, and it does not seem possible that so many years---a half-century!---have passed.
 
We two are lucky people indeed to have chosen each other. We have been a good match and selfishly wish for many more years together.

THE SMILE WAS THE BEGINNING:
("They gave each other a smile with a future in it."---Ring Lardner)

In the Bob-and-Rose collage above, the key to the message is the smiles between us. I first met Bob in early winter of 1959. It was a night of heavy snows, and I was gathered with my colleagues from the Telegraph newspaper. Snow or not, we were sticking to our plans for a toboggan party. My friend at the paper, Vivian Moore, was dropped off by her brother Bob, who felt the roads were way too treacherous for her to drive alone from Concord's then-unpaved roads.
Bob and I were briefly introduced before our group formed a caravan to the toboggan hill in Chardon in Geauga County. Something clicked between the two of us right away. At first for me, it was his smile. Fifty years later, I still love his smile and his unflagging sense of mischief and humor. We may be 50 years older now, but we still have fun together.